Posts Tagged ‘Singer’

Singer Promise 1409

Nov 11

Singer Promise 1409

I WANT THIS!!! I saw this sewing machine at Target and instantly wanted it. It was exactly what I’ve been looking for for awhile and for the right price, under $100! I love that it’s simple with all the essentials, sturdy, and compact. All in all a great beginner machine that you can also grow with. I don’t have the space for it yet unless I get rid of my vintage Singer, but hopefully soon. Oddly enough, I also prefer anything with knobs and levers rather than something with electronic push buttons! So that was a plus for me. It’s more satisfying! I’m kitschy…

Singer Promise 1409
Singer Promise 1409

Suitable for the crafter who just needs a sewing machine every once in awhile to the budding home sewer to the intermediate seamstress on a budget! It comes with everything you need for most home-sewing projects. No need to buy the buttonhole or zipper foot separately. Or have to shop around for that hard to find foot made of tungsten titanium or whatever for your Bernina. Just plug and play. For those who are serious seamstresses this may not be robust or advanced enough but for most of us home-sewers it could be the perfect sidekick and a good pinch hitter for the occasional advanced project.

~ 9 Stitch Patterns including basic and decorative
~ Automatic 4-step Buttonhole
~ Adjustable Stitch Length
~ Automatic Reverse to reinforce stitches
~ Snap-on Presser Feet, quick release for easy on/off
~ Heavy Duty Metal Frame for skip-free sewing
~ On Board Accessory Storage
~ Free Arm for sewing difficult-to-reach areas
~ Extra-High Presser Foot Lifter for bulky fabric
~ Two Needle Positions for precise top stitching

Included Accessories: Darning Plate for free motion sewing, Spool Caps, Screwdriver, Bobbins, Needles, Lint Brush/Seam Ripper, Oil Bottle, Edge/Quilting Guide, Buttonhole Foot, Button Sewing Foot, General/All Purpose Foot and Zipper Foot

Price: $91.99

Features: Unistyle Buttonhole, Built-In Thread Cutter, Built-In Light, Heavy-Duty Metal Frame, Portable, Reverse Stitch, Free Arm, Light Weight, Built-In Storage, Stitch, Width, Length Adjustments
Includes: Needles, Seam Guide, Extra Presser Feet, Bobbins, Feed Cover, Seam Ripper, Owner’s Manual
Number of Stitch Patterns: 9
Bobbin Type: Front Load Bobbin Class 15
Buttonhole Steps: 4 Step
Presser Feet Included: General Purpose Foot, Zig Zag Foot, Zipper Foot, Buttonhole Foot
Dimensions: 12.0 ” H x 15.0 ” W x 6.25 ” D; 14.2 pounds
Warranty Description: 25 Year Limited Manufacturer Warranty

Singer Promise 1409“The 1409 SINGER Promise sewing machine includes all the basic features you need to create almost any project. Basic and decorative stitches include an automatic buttonhole, easy stitch selection with adjustable stitch length and the included darning plate allows your imagination to run wild and become reality. Simple machine threading and an automatic bobbin winder make set up a breeze. A reverse lever is right at your finger tips for automatic stitch locking. Four included presser feet (general/all purpose, buttonhole, button sewing and zipper) are easily accessible in the accessory storage drawer that can be removed to create a free arm for stitching in hard-to-reach areas. Stitches include buttonhole, straight, zig zag, blind hems, rick rack, scallop, and rampart.” -Target.com

NOTE: The cheapie Singers had a bad reputation for being all plastic bodies and not very sturdy. However, “Singer made the move back to metal frames even for entry level mechanical sewing machines. This means your machine doesn’t bounce all over and is made to last. One review on Amazon claims to be an engineer and approved of the machine engineering.” SewSing.com has a nice review on it.

Also, as a coincidence, I happen to have Singer everything almost… From a sewing machine to serger to dress form. It just turned out that way. As a budding home sewer I felt all their products had the right features for the right price thus making it the right value for someone like me.

Where To Buy
Amazon.com, $129.99
Target.com, $89.99

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My Singer Tiny Serger

Aug 25

Singer Tiny Serger TS380A
Tiny Serger, Model No. TS380A
Circa 1980s – 1990s

I GOT A SERGER!! I’ve been wanting a serger for awhile. They are great for sealing raw fabric edges and working with knit fabrics. But they cost more than I’d like to invest and they take up a lot of space. Plus for a home sewer like myself, a serger is sometimes more a luxury than an essential. So it was just a pipe dream until now!

It came all the way from Bushwick, Brooklyn somewhere near Hart Street in mint condition with almost all the original accessories including the extra needle, spool caps, and threaders! I don’t know exactly when it was made but from looking at the box and pictures on it my guess is it’s from the 80′s or 90′s.

It’s more of a junior serger or kids-type hobby serger but this means it’s also extremely compact and the perfect beginner machine for someone who might just like to try it or have it around for when in a bind!

Singer Tiny Serger TS380A
Singer Tiny Serger TS380A
Singer Tiny Serger TS380A
Singer Tiny Serger TS380A

Features:
~ It’s compact and light, about 6in. x 12in.
~ The foot pedal has a switch for 2 speeds
~ There is a handy sewing light
~ Hand wheel
~ It’s super cute!

Overedge vs. Overlock
It’s actually an “Overedge” machine rather than an “Overlock” machine so it works basically like your typical serger except it does not trim or cut off the fabric edges. This can be a benefit for beginners who need practice working with a serger because the fabric does not get cut. So if it goes crooked you can simply rip out the thread and try again without the risk of losing fabric!

3 Spools vs. 4 Spools
A typical serger for home use usually has 4 spools. But the Tiny Serger only uses 3 spools. When you see a typical serger with 4 spools it will most likely be an Overlock machine that also trims the fabric as it stitches.

Resources and Manuals
The Singer Co. website is normally full of great information on all their products. But I could not find much information on the Tiny Serger. But I did find the full instruction manual!
Manual – Singer Tiny Serger, TS380A

I’ve been googling around and read mixed reviews about it. Some people say it’s difficult to work with but given its size and function it’s definitely noteworthy. Since it’s more a novelty item it may not be suitable for more serious sewers but perhaps for a budding sewer or hobbyist crafter it can be perfect!

❤ I got this as a present from Craigston Yip III, Esq. and it’s not even my birthday! My first project on this little serger will be a surprise present for the treasure hunter himself! Heart it so much and thanks. It’s perfect! ❤ ❤ ❤

What’s the difference between a Serger, an Overlock, and an Overedge Machine?
All the above are sergers. Sergers create a different type of stitch that wrap around the sides of fabric in order to join them. Unlike sewing machines, sergers only do a single stitch. This stitch cannot be reproduced in a sewing machine. Therefore a separate machine is needed for this stitch.

An Overlock machine traditionally uses 4 threads at once to create the stitch and it trims the fabric edge as it goes. An Overedge machine typically uses 3 threads at once and does not cut the fabric edges. Wikipedia has a nice intro article on sergers, overlock, and overedge machines.

I have yet to practice threading it and taking it for a test drive but will soon, so more about the Tiny Serger in action later. I’ve also only ever used the serger (overlock) featured in a previous post, so don’t have that much experience with a serger but now I’ll have a great opportunity to get comfortable with one!

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My Vintage Singer Sewing Machine

Oct 24

Singer Treadle Model 66
Singer Treadle, “AB Series”, Model No. 66. Made in Elizabeth, NJ, USA. circa 1927.

This is what started it all! Late last summer I wandered into a junk sale at the Moravian Church down the street and spotted this lovely sewing machine for $25. I had been considering sewing for awhile but didn’t know where to begin. I checked into a few things like classes and sewing machines just to get an idea of what it would take to get started. But I still hadn’t arrived at a suitable entree into it yet. Until I spotted this vintage Singer. It was in perfect working order, complete with sewing table and knee pedal, and all in excellent condition. After considering its vintage novelty and the fact that it was $25, I figured I would snap it up now to start.

Singer Treadle Model 66 Singer Treadle Model 66 Singer Treadle Model 66 Singer Treadle Model 66

It’s a treadle-style sewing machine from the 1920′s. In cast iron black enamel with gold filigree detail and engraving and most all of its original parts! Even the motor and light are original. It only does a single straight stitch in various lengths. It came in a lovely sewing table with a knee-operated pedal instead of the traditional foot pedal. I’m told attachments can be added to expand the stitch selection. Something I’ll have to check into further. At $25 it was still a luxury for me though and I still hadn’t found a suitable way for me to begin learning. But worth it.

Singer Treadle Model 66 Singer Treadle Model 66 Singer Treadle Model 66

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