Posts Tagged ‘Denim Jeans’

Catalytic Clothing – Pollution Cleaning Denim Jeans?

Oct 22

Helen Storey

Imagine if the clothes you wore were not only eco-friendly but eco-cleaners? Above is Professor Helen Storey, a London-based fashion designer, with her eco-cleaning jeans that purify the air as you wear them. Yes, her jeans which she’s been testing for 2 years claim to clean the air of nitrogen dioxide, a harmful air pollutant.

Helen along with Tony Ryan, a professor of Physical Chemistry at Sheffield University interested in polymers and soft nanotechnology, developed a fabric treatment that can turn everyday clothing like denim jeans into air pollution cleaners!

The product is actually not just a denim jean but a laundry additive called Catclo that is made out of nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. These nanoparticles of titanium dioxide are triggered by sunlight. When triggered, it causes the particles to react and this reaction absorbs NO2 in the process. It is simply added to laundry detergent, clothes are washed in said detergent, and voila! Your denim (or any article of clothing) will now be coated with nanoparticles of titanium dioxide.

Helen Storey and Tony Ryan with their Eco-Friendly Jeans
Helen Storey and Tony Ryan with their pollution cleaning jeans.
They will be at the Manchester Science Festival. This weekend Oct 27 – Nov 4 2012.

How does Catclo work?
“Catclo contains nanoparticles of titanium a thousand times thinner than a human hair. When clothes are washed with Catclo these particles are deposited on to the fibres of the fabric. When the catalysed clothes are worn, light shines on the titanium particles and it excites the electrons on the particle surface. The excited electrons try to react with something and the first thing that they see is oxygen because it’s in the air just above the surface of the particle.” — Tony Ryan

It’s not available yet but it’s in the works. Read more about Catclo, just how much air it cleans, and if there are any drawbacks. Check out their website, Catalytic Clothing for more about their project.

Oh the possibilities!
Just think. How much pollution in NY could be offset if just the crowds of people that jam up Times Square alone (Everyday during rush hour? During the holidays? On New Year’s Eve?) were all wearing eco-cleaning clothing? In Los Angeles? Tokyo? Shanghai? Delhi? Or any high population modern city where human traffic could actually be used for a practical purpose?

You don’t even have to be wearing it! Perhaps flags, curtains, patio furniture upholstery, any textile that sits outdoors can be turned into air pollution cleaners!

The simple act of line-drying your laundry in the sun could double as air pollution cleaners too. Anything from bed sheets to table cloths, towels, curtains whatever that can be machine-washed and line dried would work too. It could not only help offset any pollution caused directly or indirectly from machine-washing clothes but it also saves energy from not having to run the dryer.

On an industrial level, textile manufacturers could potentially offset their entire process if the fabrics they worked with were all treated with this product while working? Before being shipped? Who knows!

It’s a cool concept and hopefully will not only become a reality but open doors to new concepts and ideas for other eco-practical solutions. Read more about Sustainable Fabric and E-Textiles where technology meets textiles in some of my previous posts.

What is Nitrogen Dioxide?
Nitrogen Dioxide or NO2 is a toxic emission most commonly produced by cars, airplanes (or any engine that uses gas to run), power plants, gas heaters and stoves etc. It’s what most people are referring to when they say air pollution! It’s in general one of the largest man-made air pollutants in our eco system. It’s that haze you see over LA on an especially polluted day.

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Wood Cuff Jeans

Dec 28

Wood Cuff Jeans

I got a new sewing machine for christmas!! Wahoooo! Here was my first little test project on it. I tried a few stitches out on some Quilt Weight Cotton, some Home Dec Weight Cotton, and … denim!

It all started out when the Treasure Hunter asked me to fix a pair of his fave denim jeans which had an awkward tear in the crotch area! After fixing that up, we decided to do a little denim customization and added a fabric detail to the cuff on a pair of denim jeans. I used some scrap material from a beautiful fabric with wood grain print.

I didn’t do much measuring and just eyeballed everything. There wasn’t much need to true up the fabric or precise measuring. I did not even break out the iron or pre-wash the fabric. All bad habits but for a simple experiment it was fine. I marked about 4 inches from the edge of the jean cuff (see below pic) and cut out a strip of fabric 4 inches wide and long enough to wrap around the entire pant leg. Pinned and sewed! Making sure to pre-fold in the edges where I could. I also made sure to sew as invisibly as possibly by making all my stitches near the seams.

Wood Cuff Jeans Wood Cuff Jeans Wood Cuff Jeans

Pattern:
- Cut a 4 inch wide strip (add some extra width for folding down). Long enough to wrap around the entire cuff with some extra for folding in.

- Fold in the lower edge. I folded down about 1/2 inch. This edge will be attached to the bottom of the cuff. Pin down the fold.

- Turn pants inside out. Line up the folded edge to the edge of the cuff. See here. Pin it down. Leaving the leftover length by the inseam. Line up the fabric pattern or nap in the way you find most appealing. Try folding the cuff up to see how the pattern shows.

- Sew as flush along the bottom edge of the cuff (near the original cuff seam) as possible from inseam to inseam. Fold down one flap to overlap the other. Try to make sure the flap meets at the inseam. This is where you will sew to seal it. Trim excess.

- Then sew along the other end of the fabric from inseam to inseam. Sew right over the overlapping flaps to seal. Make sure fabric is smooth and flat against the jean.

- Finally sew along the inseam where the flaps overlap. Sew as close to the original seam as possible! Done!

Wood Cuff Jeans

Choose any fabric you desire for your denim cuff accents! Great for fabric scraps. Fold the cuffs back down for normal style jeans.

I chose this beautiful fabric on the left.

Brazilian Rose Wood
Graphic Design BNP by Bold Inc.
Woodworking Landscape Products
Japanese Made

❤ Thanks to the Treasure Hunter for the beautiful fabric!!

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