Pattern: Summer Shift Dress

May 25

OMG! Heart in Summer Shift Dress, My Brother in Standard Issue Grad Gear, and Mom in Vintage Adolfo
Happy Graduation to my brother, Yale SOM Class of 2011!

Hi fellow knitting, crochet, and sewing fanatics! I made my dress for my brother’s graduation! Otherwise known as my Schoolhouse Rock Dress. That day turned out cold and rainy which I wasn’t entirely prepared for :( But it all worked out. We met so many lovely fellow grads from all over the world and their families. Clever, witty, unique, and of course, off to save the world each in their own way. Architecture, Finance, Forestry/Eco, Medicine, Law, Drama, and Healthcare to name a few! Impressive and inspiring all around! We were also treated to a sea of creatively decorated graduation hats, heard some wonderful class speakers that stole the show from Tom Hanks, ate delicious, albeit soggy, sandwiches in makeshift classrooms, and above all helped some graduates celebrate the completion of years of hard work. So congratulations to my brother and his 216 classmates! We heart you, De!

Schoolhouse Rock Dress is a dressier version of the Summer Shift Dress I made. It’s just in a different color and long! I am also wearing my Tri-Strand Cowl over it. I wouldn’t normally pair them both together but had to out of necessity! If you’d like to make this simple yet satisfying knit dress see below for the pattern.

Materials:
3 Balls Lang Yarns Sol Dégradé, Spirit, 100% Combed Cotton, 220 yards. $20 per ball
US Size 13 [9.00mm] Circular Knitting Needles, 24″ Clover Takumi Velvets, $15

Measurements & Sizing:
Flat Measurements – Width: Approx. 21 inches. Height: Approx. 53 inches. When worn, the dress has a lot of give and drape given the loose knit. So this will fit anywhere from petite sizes to big/tall sizes depending on the look you’d like. I wanted the dress super long past my ankles when belted. I’m 5′ 4” and about 145 pounds. The dress is really roomy and hangs down to my ankles and a few inches off the floor if I’m wearing heels. So it was on the short side. But as the day wore on, it lengthened! So the dress will settle and lengthen to its proper length after a few wears. Hang overnight on a dress form or hanger to help it along!

Pattern:
The full pattern for Summer Shift Dress is here.

Notes:
The only difference between this dress pattern and the Summer Shift Dress is 2 things –
      1. It uses 3 balls of Lang Yarn instead of 2 balls
      2. I used US Size 13 [9.00mm] circular needles instead of the US Size 15.

This pattern uses 3 full balls of the Lang Yarn. There were a few scraps to spare but I basically split the 2 pieces, front and back, into 1.5 balls each with a little left over to whipstitch the pieces together. For taller people it might be a good idea to get a 4th ball to add more rows. When Loopy Mango made this dress they added contrasting yarn to the train for some added detail and length!

Unbelted it looks/wears like a giant muumuu or dashiki!

Summer Shift Dress -  Long Summer Shift Dress -  Long Summer Shift Dress -  Long Summer Shift Dress -  Long Lang Yarns Sol Degrade in Spirit

Additional Clothing & Accessories On This Page
Bag – Miss Lonelyhearts
Hat – Stetson
Belt – UNIQLO, 2006
Slip Black – H & M, 2011
Mom’s Dress – Vintage Adolfo – It’s all Machine Knit!
Indian Cuff Shoes – Vintage, Brazil

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2 Responses to “Pattern: Summer Shift Dress”

  1. Robin Laurie says:

    trying to find this pattern. pulled it out of magazine but forgot the instructions!!!!! Butterfly Dress Design by Kim Rutledge for Caron International. Any help would be great. Thanks. Robin

  2. [...] If you’d like to try the long dress version in the picture above, it will take a total of 3 balls of Lang Sol Dégradé! Feel free to mix and match yarns. Again, Habu would be a great substitute for a slightly different look/feel and a nice showcase for their exquisite yarns. See here for my post on the Long Summer Shift Dress. [...]

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